flotsam and jetsam

rebelliousmom:

manhatingfeminist:

More people are concerned with why women stay in abusive relationships than why men are abusing women

real talk

proud-atheist:

http://proud-atheist.tumblr.com
quietandsarcastic:

Read it again:  EVERY.  SINGLE.  REPUBLICAN.  Yes, that includes women. 

quietandsarcastic:

Read it again:  EVERY.  SINGLE.  REPUBLICAN.  Yes, that includes women. 

thedragoninmygarage:

Perhaps the greatest success story in public health is the reduction of infectious diseases resulting from the use of vaccines. Routine immunization has eradicated smallpox from the globe and led to the near elimination of wild polio virus. Vaccines have reduced some preventable infectious diseases to an all-time low, and now few people experience the devastating effects of measles, pertussis, and other illnesses. Prior to approval by the Food and Drug Administration (FDA), vaccines are tested extensively by scientists to ensure they are effective and safe. Vaccines are the best defense we have against infectious diseases; however, no vaccine is 100% safe or effective. Differences in the way individual immune systems react to a vaccine account for rare occasions when people are not protected following immunization or when they experience side effects.

As the incidence of infectious diseases continues to decline, some people have become less interested in the consequences of preventable illnesses like diphtheria and tetanus. Instead, they have become increasingly concerned about the risks associated with vaccines. After all, vaccines are given to healthy individuals, many of whom are children, and therefore a high standard of safety is required. Since vaccination is such a common and memorable event, any illness following immunization may be attributed to the vaccine. While some of these reactions may be caused by the vaccine, many of them are unrelated events that occur after vaccination by coincidence. Therefore, the scientific research that attempts to distinguish true vaccine side effects from unrelated, chance occurrences is crucial. This knowledge is necessary to maintain public confidence in immunization programs. As science continues to advance, we strive to develop safer vaccines and improve delivery to protect ourselves against disease more effectively.

Credit: CDC

By the way, I’m 6’4” and weigh 220 pounds. Technically, I’m a “nasty BIG cunt.” Thanks for sharing you thoughtful message :)

thedragoninmygarage:

Perhaps the greatest success story in public health is the reduction of infectious diseases resulting from the use of vaccines. Routine immunization has eradicated smallpox from the globe and led to the near elimination of wild polio virus. Vaccines have reduced some preventable infectious diseases to an all-time low, and now few people experience the devastating effects of measles, pertussis, and other illnesses. Prior to approval by the Food and Drug Administration (FDA), vaccines are tested extensively by scientists to ensure they are effective and safe. Vaccines are the best defense we have against infectious diseases; however, no vaccine is 100% safe or effective. Differences in the way individual immune systems react to a vaccine account for rare occasions when people are not protected following immunization or when they experience side effects.

As the incidence of infectious diseases continues to decline, some people have become less interested in the consequences of preventable illnesses like diphtheria and tetanus. Instead, they have become increasingly concerned about the risks associated with vaccines. After all, vaccines are given to healthy individuals, many of whom are children, and therefore a high standard of safety is required. Since vaccination is such a common and memorable event, any illness following immunization may be attributed to the vaccine. While some of these reactions may be caused by the vaccine, many of them are unrelated events that occur after vaccination by coincidence. Therefore, the scientific research that attempts to distinguish true vaccine side effects from unrelated, chance occurrences is crucial. This knowledge is necessary to maintain public confidence in immunization programs. As science continues to advance, we strive to develop safer vaccines and improve delivery to protect ourselves against disease more effectively.

Credit: CDC

By the way, I’m 6’4” and weigh 220 pounds. Technically, I’m a “nasty BIG cunt.” Thanks for sharing you thoughtful message :)

There always seems to be that one know-it-all coworker that tries to tell you the “right way” to care for your patients…

holygoddamnshitballs:

MSNBC host Rachel Maddow tore into both houses of Congress on Thursday for voting to take another break just as the country’s engagement in another armed conflict is about to escalate.

“There’s a reason the American public finds this Congress repellent,” she said. “There’s a reason why this Congress has the lowest approval ratings in the history of Congress and in the spectrum of all major institutions in our country.”

narunfiltered:

Supermarket

Long Island, NY

I work behind the customer service desk for a large supermarket retail chain known in the Northeast of the US.

I’m kind of a gothy girl and today I wore my Marilyn Manson tee shirt to work

This morning, I was speaking with another cashier before I punched in and…

atheistjack:

via Ultimate Atheism

holygoddamnshitballs: